THE LIFE OF HENRY DAVID THOREAU THROUGH THE LENS OF HIS REMARKABLE JOURNAL IS THE SUBJECT OF A NEW MORGAN EXHIBITION

Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862) occupies a lofty place in American cultural history. He spent two years in a cabin by Walden Pond and a single night in jail, and out of those experiences grew two of this country’s most influential works: his book Walden and the essay known as “Civil Disobedience.” But his lifelong journal—more voluminous by far than his published writings—reveals a fuller, more intimate picture of a man of wide-ranging interests and a profound commitment to living responsibly and passionately.

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