Power and Grace: Ecumenical Rubens

David Freedberg

Rubens was a great and varied draughtsman. One could call him ecumenical in his extraordinary stylistic range and his engagement with the work of his predecessors and his contemporaries. But Rubens was also a politician and diplomat, who worked towards the reconciliation of religious and political difference. In this lecture, David Freedberg, Pierre Matisse Professor of the History of Art at Columbia University and Director of the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, will demonstrate how the drawings in the exhibition Power and Grace: Drawings by Rubens, Van Dyck, and Jordaens reveal not just his artistic virtuosity, but his efforts to seek peace in his time.

The exhibition Power and Grace: Drawings by Rubens, Van Dyck, and Jordaens will be open at 5:30 pm for program attendees.

Wednesday, March 7, 6:30 pm
Tickets: 
$15; $10 for members; free for students with a valid ID.

Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640), Seated Male Youth, ca. 1613, black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on light gray paper, purchased by Pierpont Morgan (1837–1913) in 1909, The Morgan Library & Museum, I, 232. Photography by Steven H. Crossot, 2014.

Please call (212) 685-0008 ext. 560 or e-mail [email protected] for information.