Book of Hours

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Record ID: 
76887
Accession number: 
MS M.46
Title: 
Book of Hours
Created: 
Belgium, perhaps Ghent; England, ca. 1420.
Binding: 
English 19th-century black morocco gilt in red morocco case.
Credit: 
Purchased by J. Pierpont Morgan (1837-1913) in 1902.
Description: 
171 leaves (1 column, 19 lines), bound : vellum, ill. ; 180 x 130 mm
Provenance: 
Censored in 1562 at the Castillo de Triana by the Inquisition; collection of Vice-Admiral Lord Mark Robert Kerr (1776-1840); Quaritch, catalogue 118 (1891), no. 823; catalogue 138 (1893), no. 109; catalogue 154 (1895), no. 176; bought Feb. 2, 1900 by Richard Bennett, Catalogue of manuscripts and early printed books from the libraries of William Morris, Richard Bennett, Bertram, fourth Earl of Ashburnham, and other sources, no. 78; purchased by J. Pierpont Morgan (1837-1913) with the Bennett Collection in 1902; J.P. Morgan (1867-1943).
Notes: 

Ms. book of hours for the use of Sarum (Hours of the Virgin, calendar) and Rome (Office of the Dead); written and illuminated in Belgium, perhaps Ghent, ca. 1420; additions in England, ca. 1420.
Decoration: 30 full-page miniatures, decorated initials, and border ornament.
Artists: Master of Guillebert de Mets and two anonymous English artists.
The English artist responsible for the miniatures of the Passion sequence starting on fol. 53v may be the same as the artist of London, British Library, Harley 4605, as well as Illustrator B in the London Psalter (Victoria & Albert Museum, Ms. Reid 42), whose hand is also found in Pierpont Morgan Library MS M.893; the second English artist, responsible for fol. 44v, may be the same as Illustrator C of the Victoria & Albert Psalter--Cf. K. Scott, p. 216.

Script: 
textura
Language: 
Latin
Classification: 

The Master of Guillebert de Mets is named after the scribe who signed a manuscript (today in Paris) of Boccaccio's Decameron made for Duke Philip the Good of Burgundy, to which the artist contributed nearly a third of the hundred miniatures. Active about 1420 to 1445, probably in Ghent, the Guillebert Master and the younger Master of the Ghent Privileges were the two leading illuminators in Flanders during the second quarter of the fifteenth century. (Their similar styles are easily confused.) The Guillebert Master was at times a subtler colorist, as seen in this St. Christopher Carrying the Christ Child.