"The Artist" page 1

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Oscar Wilde
(1854–1900)

"The Artist," from Poems in Prose. Autograph manuscript, undated. 3 p., including cover sheet for Poems in Prose.

Gift of Lucia Moreira Salles, 2008

MA 7258.3
Transcription: 

(1)

Higdon [typesetter's name]

The Artist.

He could only think in bronze.
And One morning there came to him into upon into his soul the a the desire idea to fashion an the an image of The Pleasure that lives abideth for a Moment. And he went forth into the world to look for bronze. For he could only think in bronze.
    But all the bronze in of the whole world had disappeared, nor anywhere in the whole world was there any bronze to be found, save only the bronze of the bronze great image of The Sorrow that endureth for Ever. that he had fashioned with his own hands for the tomb of the woman he had most loved in life.
    Now this bronze great image he had himself, and with his own hands, fashioned, and had set it on the tomb of the one thing he had loved in life. On the tomb of the dead thing woman thing he had most loved had he set this image of his own fashioning, that it might serve as a sign of the Love of man that dieth not and as a symbol of the sorrow of the man that endureth for ever. And in the whole world there was no other bronze save the bronze of this image.
    So he took the bronze image he had fashioned and gave it to the